Hundreds of people collaborated with Archigram, helping with the magazines, collaborating on designs, working on exhibitions and publications, providing occasional sources of funding (more frequent!) in-kind support. This list is drawn from the material in the collection itself and is mainly limited to those who worked with Archigram during the period 1961-74, as well as some who had parallel careers. We welcome information from other people who collaborated on these projects.

  • Ken Allinson
    Architect, author, teacher and architectural guide. Just after qualifying as an architect, he worked on several projects with Archigram which included Bournemouth Steps, 1970 (Project no. 145); Paris Exhibition (COI), 1970 (Project no. 148); Malaysia Exhibition, 1973 (Project no.166); Batiment Public Monte Carlo, 1969-73 (Project no. 134); Sporting d’Ete (Summer Casino) – Monte Carlo Palm Tree, 1971 (Project no. 152). Allinson was also a contributor to Archigram 9½, 1974 (Project no.100.95). He has worked at various practices, including Wolff Olins Design. Latterly he co-founded London Open House (now London Open City) and is a partner in Architectural Dialogue with Victoria Thornton. Author of London’s Contemporary Architecture: An Explorer’s Guide (2009).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Will Alsop
    Highly influential and colourful architect and painter. He was taught by all six members of Archigram and went on to work for Cedric Price. With Paul Shepheard, he was one of the exhibitors at the Adhocs Gallery (Project no. 164). He went on to set up practice first with John Lyall and then on his own in a variety of offices and with a variety of collaborators, winning the Stirling Prize in 2000 for his Peckham Library. He is an OBE and a Royal Academician.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Andrew Anderson
    Contributor to Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5), in which his ‘An Endpiece’, was featured.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Ant Farm
    The closest American parallel to Archigram, founded in 1968 by Doug Michels, Chip Lord, Hudson Marquez and Roger Dainton. Michels was a graduate of Yale University with an Archigram-type design for his final project. Named after the children’s nature kit that trapped ants into building a viewable colony behind glass, Ant Farm was a word-play on being an ‘underground’ architecture group. They taught at the University of Texas in Houston from 1969 before returning to San Francisco in 1973, where Ant Farm made innovative sculptures and films. Best known were Media Burn (1975), where they drove a Cadillac through a wall of flaming TV sets while dressed as astronauts, and Cadillac Ranch (1974), just outside Amarillo in Texas. Dubbed ‘America’s Stonehenge’, ten finned-Cadillacs were buried in a straight line at a slight angle. It became a roadside attraction, graffiti-strewn, and eulogised in song by Bruce Springsteen. Ant Farm dissolved in 1978, although they are finding recognition in the USA, since Doug Michels’s death in a hiking accident in Australia in 2003. Ant Farm did not collaborate directly with Archigram, but admitted their influence, and projects like Electronic Oasis (Time Capsule) and inflatable structures such as Dream Cloud were published in Architectural Design.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Graham Anthony
    Student at Regent Street Polytechnic, London (now University of Westminster), and the Architectural Association, graduating in 1963. He contributed to Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5) with Ian Horton and Terry Stuart where their project for South Bank Linear City was featured in that issue.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • C. Antonioli
    Student at the School of Architecture in Rome. Contributed to Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5) where his design with B. Berandi, M. Cocco, G. Di Salvo, C. Ettore, S. Groppo, A. Sebasti, F. Tegolini, M. Tondi and G. Tornelli for the PRG centre in Rome was featured.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Ian Archer
    Studied at the Architectural Association. Archer's work formed part of a collage that featured in Archigram 7, 1966 (Project no. 100.7).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • ARCHIGRAM
    The name was coined to describe the Archigram magazine, but was soon applied to the six protagonists (Chalk, Cook, Crompton, Greene, Herron and Webb) as a group, and that remains its most familiar usage. Archigram projects were done by various individuals or groupings of these six people, and sometimes include projects done in other professional offices where the members of Archigram were working. Many other contributors worked on individual Archigram projects, and have been credited where information is available. Archigram’s own office ran from 1970-74, involving (in various degrees, as some were abroad) all of the six main protagonists and many other contributors. To add to the complex uses of the name: a business partnership, Archigram Architects, was set up between Cook, Crompton and Herron. The Archigram Archives is the name of the largest collection of Archigram work, held and managed by Dennis Crompton; whereas the Archigram Archival Project is a separate project, run by the University of Westminster in collaboration with Archigram (surviving members) and the heirs of those who have, sadly, died.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Architectural Association (AA)
    World-famous independent architectural school located in Bedford Square in central London, was first set up by young office trainees in 1847, undergoing many dramatic changes since then. Peter Cook studied at the Architectural Association in the late-1950s, as did many contemporary and later Archigram collaborators. All the members of Archigram have at various times taught at, exhibited at, and been published by the AA, and many of their projects were generated there (e.g. David Greene’s naked photocopy portrait of himself, Project no 201). Archigram designed the AA's 125 Exhibition in 1972 (Project no. 158) and Archigram’s work was often published in AAQ (Architectural Association Quarterly) magazine. The AA took an advert out in Archigram 9, 1970 (Project no. 100.9). The Architectural Association school bookshop also sold and distributed Archigram magazines from Archigram 4, 1964 (Project no. 100.4), onwards.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Architectural Design (AD)
    One of the most influential architectural journals in post-war Britain, especially in the 1960s and 1970s, when it was edited by Monica Pidgeon. The AD published many articles on and by Archigram, and took out an advert in Archigram 9, 1970 (Project no. 100.9).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Archizoom
    Italian experimental architecture group founded in 1966 sharing Archigram's interest in Pop Art, consumer culture and modern urban transformations and clearly emulating them in their choice of name -- the 'Zoom' issue of Archigram having been published in 1964. Archizoom was founded in 1966 in Florence by four architects (Andrea Branzi, Gilberto Corretti, Paolo Deganello, Massimo Morozzi) and two designers (Dario Bartolini and Lucia Bartolini). Branzi had recently studied architecture at the University of Florence alongside Adolfo Natalini and Cristiano Toraldo di Francia, who set up Superstudio. At times Archizoom collaborated with their fellow Florentine (and also clearly Archigram-inspired) group Superstudio, such as on the Superarchitecture project (1966), while other later projects, such as No-Stop City, were entirely Archizoom's own.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • John Attenborough
    Architect who worked at the London County Council (LCC), with Archigram members Ron Herron, Warren Chalk and Dennis Crompton on the South Bank Development, 1960-62 (Project no. 17). He collaborated on Lincoln Civic Centre Competition, 1961 (Project no. 29), with Warren Chalk, Dennis Crompton and Mike Webb, the Lillington Street Housing Competition, 1961 (Project no. 22) and co-designed of the Westminster housing scheme (1961) with John Roberts, as featured in Archigram 2, 1962 (Project no. 100.2). He went on to design buildings including High Wycombe sports centre.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • J. Baker
    Studied at the Architectural Association, graduating in 1964. Contributed to Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5) where his Housing project with R. Byrne (1963) was featured.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Ben Banham
    Son of (Peter) Reyner and Mary Banham. Along with James Meller and Gus Coral, he made a model of Plug-In City from the cut-out components of Archigram 7, 1966 (Project no. 100.07). Initially featuring in an Archigram exhibition, the model was later burnt in the Art Net space, footage of which is held by Dennis Crompton within the Archigram Archives.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Mary Banham
    Artist and author, married to (Peter) Reyner Banham and a formidable intellect in her own right. She wrote a book (with Bevis Hiller) on the 1951 Festival of Britain titled A Tonic to the Nation (1976) and co-edited a collection of her husband’s essays after his death in A Critic Writes (1996). She hosted, with her husband, a series of Sunday coffee mornings in their home in the 1960s, operating rather like salon events, and attended by the great and the good such as Buckminster Fuller when he was in London. Their house in Aberdare Gardens in Swiss Cottage, London, was just across the road from where Peter Cook was then living with his first wife, Hazel Cook. In the late-1990s, Mary Banham commissioned a Californian ‘Case-Study’ type home in the Cambridgeshire fens as a retirement home.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Peter Reyner Banham
    (1922-1988) Prolific and vastly influential writer, critic, historian – indeed, probably the most important architectural critic in post-war Britain. Seminal books include Theory and Design in the First Machine Age (1960), The New Brutalism: Ethic or Aesthetic (1966), The Architecture of the Well-Tempered Environment (1969), Los Angeles: The Architecture of the Four Ecologies (1971), and Megastructures: Urban Futures of the Recent Past (1976). He was also one of the first writers to recognise the importance of Archigram (e.g. his essay on ‘A Clip-On Architecture’ in Architectural Design, 35 November 1965, pp.534-535), calling the group ‘short on theory, long on fun’. Banham is often credited as being largely responsible for the ‘internationalisation’ of Archigram when he took newly-printed copies of Archigram 4 (‘Zoom’), 1964 (Project no. 100.4), to America with him on a lecture tour. Later, he wrote a sympathetic book on the work of Ron Herron, titled The Visions of Ron Herron (1994), which was only published after Herron’s death.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Michael Barnard
    Collaborator on Bac-Pac Man (Invisible University/Electric Aborigine), 1969 (Project no. 138) with David Greene. Contributor to Archigram 9, 1970 (Project no. 100.9). Barnard studied fine art at Nottingham Art College under Victor Burgin. Went on to collaborate with Greene in forming the Institute of Electric Anthropology and on a number of projects for the fashion designer Paul Smith as a design group called Barnard Greene Design. Barnard has continued to work with Smith.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Sylvia Bartlett
    Studied at the Architectural Association, and with Leslie Fairweather ran an office in Newman Passage in central London. For a while, Archigram also had a part of this office. Her work featured in a collage of projects in Archigram 7, 1966 (Project no. 100.7).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • B. Berardi
    Studied at the School of Architecture in Rome. Contributed to Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5) where his design with C. Antonioli, M. Cocco, G. Di Salvo, C. Ettore, S. Groppo, A. Sebasti, F. Tegolini, M. Tondi and G. Tornelli for the PRG centre in Rome was featured.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • G. Bertolini
    Studied at the School of Architecture in Rome. Contributed to Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5) where his design with L. Ceci, P. Cidonio, M. Parlato, A. Rosti and H. Vezzali for the PRG centre in Rome was featured.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Bob Blagden
    Worked on Airplane Panels for the Milan Triennale installation, 1967-8 (Project no. 107), as featured in Archigram 8, 1968 (Project no. 100.8).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Peter Blake
    (1920-2006) Anglo-American architect, author and editor of Architectural Record from 1950-72, then the leading US journal, where he reviewed Archigram 4, 1964 (Project no. 100.4), having had the magazine shown to him by Reyner Banham. He also reviewed Walking City, 1964 (Project no. 64) for Architectural Forum, 1968.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Christopher Blencowe
    Studied at the Architectural Association. Blencowe's work formed part of a collage that featured in Archigram 7, 1966 (Project no. 100.7).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • John Bodley
    Edited Living Arts Magazine with Theo Crosby, producing the 'Catalogue', 1963 (Project no. 37) for the Living City exhibition at the Institute of Contemporary Arts, London, as part of Living Arts issue 2.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Naomi Borstein
    Architect. Worked on Royal Mint Square Housing, 1974 (Project no.180) with Ron Herron, as featured in Archigram 9½, 1974 (Project no. 100.95). She also worked on Calverton End Children’s Playground in Milton Keynes, 1972 (Project no. 165). The model for this scheme also featured in Archigram 9½.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • John Bowstead
    Artist -- better known as one of the British Pop Artists -- who worked on the Light/Sound Workshop at Hornsey College of Art (Media Experiments 1-4, 1968; [Project no. 118]). Worked also on Airplane Panels for the Milan Triennale installation, 1967-8 (Project no. 107), as featured in Archigram 8, 1968 (Project no. 100.8). His project on Informaison: Multi-Channel Audio-Visual Environmental System, with Roger Jeffs, featured in Archigram 8, while his All-Singing Multi-Media Spectacular, presented with friends, was advertised in Archigram 9, 1970 (Project no. 100.9). Bowstead went on to become Head of Visual and Performing Arts at the Working Men's College.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Digby Bridges
    Bridges, Martin and Moon all studied at the Architectural Association, graduating in 1962. Their Euroway project (1962), with Farrow, was featured in Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Building Design Partnership (BDP)
    One of the largest multidisciplinary architectural practices in post-war Britain. Through the agency of David Rock, one of the partners, who ran BDP’s London office and later became President of the RIBA, BDP provided sponsorship for Archigram’s magazines in return for advertisements placed in Archigram 2, 1962 (Project no. 100.2); Archigram 3, 1963 (Project no. 100.3); Archigram 4, 1964 (Project no. 100.4); and Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Bruce Burgess
    From the USA, Burgess' work featured in a collage that formed part of Archigram 7, 1966 (Project no. 100.7).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Will Burtin
    (1908-1972) Graphic designer and art director for Fortune magazine, designer of the ‘Brain’ scientific visualisation of human cells. His image was featured in Archigram 4, 1964 (Project no. 100.04).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • R. Byrne
    Studied at the Architectural Association, graduating in 1964. Contributed to Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5) where his and J. Baker's Housing project (1963) was featured.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • L. Ceci
    Studied at the School of Architecture in Rome. Contributed to Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5) where his design with G. Bertolini, P. Cidonio, M. Parlato, A. Rosti and H. Vezzali for the PRG centre in Rome was featured.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Phyllis Chalk
    (1928-2002) Née Adams; married to Warren Chalk. A qualified architect, Adams graduated from Queens University, Belfast. She worked for London County Council, based in Croydon, where she met Warren Chalk, whom she married. Later, she worked at the Department of the Environment. Mother of two daughters, Daphne Chalk-Birdsall and Gail Murray.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Daphne Chalk Birdsall
    Counsellor, chartered librarian and elder daughter of Warren Chalk. She is Academic Liaison Librarian for Architecture and Spatial Design at London Metropolitan University, whilst also running a small private practice as a Psychodynamic counsellor. She helped to cut out the 'pop-up' centre-spread of Archigram 4, 1964 (Project no. 100.4). Chalk-Birdsall has also acted as an advisor on the Archigram Archival Project.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Priscilla Chapman
    Author of Plug-In City Article, 1964, (Project no. 64) featured in Sunday Times Colour Supplement, of which she was the editor.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • David Chapman
    Studied at Norwich and Regent Street Polytechnic (now University of Westminster), graduating in 1963. Contributed to Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5) where his Competition Project for Piccadilly Circus (1960) was featured.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Chrysalis
    Formed in 1968 as Envirolab by Denny Lord, Chris Dawson and Alan Stanton, at the Department of Urban Design, UCLA in Los Angeles, where Stanton and Dawson were students from the Architectural Association over on postgraduate scholarships. They went on to become Chrysalis in 1969, along with Mike Davies, another scholarship student recently arrived from the AA. Working together as Chrysalis, they designed and installed a variety of remarkable inflatable and temporary structures using the latest space-age materials. Their best-known projects included a set for the film of Myra Breckenridge (1970) and the Pepsi Cola dome at the 1970 Osaka Expo. Stanton, Davies and Dawson returned to work with Piano & Rogers on the Pompidou Centre in Paris. Chrysalis/Envirolab were contributors to Archigram 9, 1970 (Project no.100.9).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • P. Cidonio
    Student at the School of Architecture in Rome. Contributed to Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5) where his design with G. Bertolini, L. Ceci, M. Parlato, A. Rosti and H. Vezzali for the PRG centre in Rome was featured.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • M. Cocco
    Student at the School of Architecture in Rome. Contributed to Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5) where his design with C. Antonioli, B. Berandi, G. Di Salvo, C. Ettore, S. Groppo, A. Sebasti, F. Tegolini, M. Tondi and G. Tornelli for the PRG centre in Rome was featured.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Charles Colbert
    (1921-2007) New Orleans architect whose work includes the Phyllis Wheatley Elementary School and Olivetti Showroom, New Orleans. His project for an Audio-Visual Helmet (1957) was featured in Archigram 8, 1968 (Project no. 100.8).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Simon Connolly
    His project with Mike Davies, Johnny Devas, David Harrison and Dave Martin for Flopout 3: 'Non-Pod' featured in Archigram 8, 1968 (Project no. 100.8).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Hazel Cook
    Née Fennel, artist and first wife of Peter Cook and a key supporter of Archigram. Worked on the Milan Triennale installation, including Airplane Panels, 1967-8 (Project no. 107), as featured in Archigram 8, 1968 (Project no. 100.8). She worked for many years as slide librarian at the Architectural Association and a painter, with work exhibited at the ICA in July 1972 and the AA in 1995.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Coop Himmelblau
    Iconoclastic and highly influential Austrian architectural practice set up by Wolf Prix and Helmut Swiczinsky, who went on to become major architects of the so-called ‘Deconstructivist’ movement in the 1990s and beyond. Today their offices are based in Vienna, Los Angeles and Guadalajara, with major developments around the world. Their early Bubble Project featured in Archigram 9, 1970 (Project no. 100.9), and they exhibited at Archigram’s Adhocs Gallery, Endell Street London, 1972 (Project no. 164).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Gus Coral
    Along with Ben Banham and James Meller, Coral made a model of Plug-In City from the cut-out components of Archigram 7, 1966 (Project no. 100.7). Initially featuring in an Archigram exhibition, the model was later burnt in the Art Net space, footage of which is held by Dennis Crompton within the Archigram Archives.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Keith Critchlow
    Architect, lecturer, writer, and exponent of ’Sacred Geometry’, who was for a period a key figure at Prince Charles’s Institute of Architecture school in London due to his exacting drawing methods and his quasi-mystical reverence for Islamic and other geometrical patterns. A project by Critchlow, titled simply 1967 was featured in Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Theo Crosby
    (1925-1994) A highly energetic architect, sculptor, writer and designer. During the 1950s Crosby was technical editor/designer of Architectural Design and also a co-curator of the seminal This Is Tomorrow exhibition at London’s Whitechapel Gallery. Later on he became the founder of Pentagram and Professor of Architecture and Design at the Royal College of Art. During the 1960s, Crosby worked for Taylor Woodrow on the large Euston Station redevelopment scheme, 1962-65 (Project no. 33) and also on the Fulham Study, 1963 (Project no. 42). He gave jobs in his office team to all the members of Archigram, while at the same time recommending them to the Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA) for the Living City exhibition, 1963 (Project no. 36).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Gary Crossley
    Worked on Airplane Panels for the Milan Triennale installation, 1967-8 (Project no. 107), as featured in Archigram 8, 1968 (Project no. 100.8).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • James Cubitt
    Large commercial architectural, building and planning practice in London where Peter Cook and David Greene were working while producing Archigram 1, 1961, (Project no. 100.1).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Luiz Cunha
    From Porto in Portugal, Cunha's work featured in a collage that formed part of Archigram 7, 1966 (Project no. 100.7).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • David Curry
    Worked at the London County Council and contributed to Archigram 2, 1962 (Project no. 100.2).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Barry Curtis
    Academic and cultural theorist. He taught for many years at Middlesex University, becoming Professor of Visual Culture, before becoming a Fellow at the London Consortium and Visiting Tutor at the Royal College of Art. A prolific author on a wide range of subject, Curtis has written extensively on Archigram, as well as building up close links with the group. He was the PhD supervisor for Simon Sadler, who wrote his doctorate on Archigram, published as Archigram: Architecture without Architecture (2005). Curtis has also acted as an advisor on the Archigram Archival Project.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • François Dallegret
    Artist who worked extensively with ideas like ‘tamed technology’ and ‘urban objects’. He attended the Aspen Design Conference in 1968 along with Archigram, and was reputedly the nude body-double for Reyner Banham in the famous montage of their jointly designed Environment Bubble for the American desert, complete with air-conditioning unit. Dallegret’s Estheticien Acid project was featured in Archigram 8, 1968 (Project no. 100.08).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Mike Davies
    Studied at the Architectural Association and then UCLA under Peter Cook in the 1960s, forming part of the Chrysalis group with Alan Stanton and Chris Dawson. His project with Simon Connolly, Johnny Devas, David Harrison and Dave Martin for Flopout 3: 'Non-Pod' featured in Archigram 8, 1968 (Project no. 100.8). He went on to work with Piano+Rogers on the Pompidou Centre, later becoming a partner of the Richard Rogers Partnership, and was responsible for structures including Lloyds of London and the Millennium Dome.



    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Kathy de Witt
    She worked in the Archigram office and collaborated on many projects including Calverton End Adventure Playground, Milton Keynes, 1969-73 (Project no. 165). She is named as the photographer in Archigram 9½, 1974 (Project no. 100.95).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Johnny Devas
    His project with Simon Connolly, Mike Davies, David Harrison and Dave Martin for Flopout 3: 'Non-Pod' featured in Archigram 8, 1968 (Project no. 100.8).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • G. Di Salvo
    Student at the School of Architecture in Rome. Contributed to Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5) where his design with C. Antonioli, B. Berandi, M. Cocco, C. Ettore, S. Groppo, A. Sebasti, F. Tegolini, M. Tondi and G. Tornelli for the PRG centre in Rome was featured.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • John Donat
    Worked as an architect at the London County Council before becoming a well-known architectural/art photographer. Photographed the model of Calverton Road which was featured in Archigram 9½, 1974 (Project no 100.95).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Tony Dugdale
    Studied at the Architectural Association and went on to work for Piano & Rogers on Pompidou Centre before setting up practice with his wife Pat as Marine Design Consultants in Paris. Contributed to Archigram 7, 1966 (Project no. 100.07) where his 1965-6 project Learning Shed was featured. The Dugdale Ramp also featured on the cut-out page of Archigram 7. Dugdale’s 28 and Medikit project, as presented to the Paris Biennale in 1969, featured in Archigram 9, 1970 (Project no. 100.9).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Norman Engleback
    Group leader of the Special Works Division at the London County Council, heading the South Bank Development, 1960-62 (Project no. 17). His team included Warren Chalk, Ron Herron, Dennis Crompton and John Attenborough.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • English Electric Co Ltd
    Formed in 1918, EEC was taken over by General Electric Company (GEC) in 1968. Their prototype Reinforced Plastic Dome was featured in Archigram 3, 1963 (Project no. 100.3).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Ralph Erskine
    (1914-2005) English/Swedish architect, best known as the designer of Byker Wall community-based housing project in Newcastle, London Ark at Hammersmith and Greenwich Millennium Village. His project for the Lulea Shopping Centre was featured in Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • C. Ettore
    Student at the School of Architecture in Rome. Contributed to Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5) where his design with C. Antonioli, B. Berandi, M. Cocco, G. Di Salvo, S. Groppo, A. Sebasti, F. Tegolini, M. Tondi and G. Tornelli for the PRG centre in Rome was featured.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Jim Farrow
    His Euroway project with recent graduates from the Architectural Association, Digby Bridges, John Martin and Harry Moon, was featured in Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Hazel Fennel
    See Hazel Cook.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Chris Feron
    Worked with Archigram on Margate Study, 1972-3 (Project no. 168) as Construction Cost consultant.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Ben Fether
    Designed the cover of Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5) with his wife, Rae.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Rae Fether
    Designed the cover of Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5) with her husband, Ben.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • James Fitzgibbon
    (1915-1985) American architect and planner who for a period worked in partnership with Buckminster Fuller, for instance on the Old Man River project to house 30,000-50,000 people under a huge dome. His City on the Water project (1960) was featured in Archigram 4, 1964 (Project no. 100.4).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Kevin Foley
    Studied at the Architectural Association. Foley's work formed part of a collage that featured in Archigram 7, 1966 (Project no. 100.7).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Alan Forrest
    Worked for the London County Council on the 500-bed hotel project for the South Bank, London, 1958 (Project no. 6) and the TV Centre and Offices project for the South Bank, 1958 (Project no. 7).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Colin Fournier
    Architect and Professor of Architecture at the Bartlett School of Architecture, University College London. He worked in the Archigram office on Batiment Public Monte Carlo, 1969-73 (Project no. 134); Bournemouth Steps, 1970 (Project no 145); Sporting d’Ete (Summer Casino) – Monte Carlo Palm Tree, 1971 (Project no. 152); Margate Study, 1972-3 (Project no. 168). Fournier later worked in the 1980s as the job architect on Bernard Tschumi’s project for Parc de la Villette in Paris. With Peter Cook, he set up Spacelab to design the Kunsthaus Graz project in Austria (2001-03) which was shortlisted for the Stirling Prize.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Jeremie Frank
    Worked in the Archigram office and on later projects with Peter Cook, like Arcadia.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Yona Friedman
    Highly influential experimental architect, born in Budapest but a naturalised French citizen. His groundbreaking Ville Spatiale (Spatial City) project proposed architecture as a flexible, mobile and temporary framework. ‘Spatial Quarter’ was featured in Archigram 3, 1963 (Project no. 100.3). He also contributed to Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5) where his Spatial City was featured. Friedman was also listed under ‘People to look out for’ in Archigram 6, 1965 (Project 100.6).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Richard Buckminster Fuller (Bucky)
    Hugely influential and visionary American engineer, inventor, futurist, writer and thinker, probably best known as the designer and patent holder for the Geodesic Dome, Dymaxion House and Wichita House. His work was extremely influential on Archigram (David Greene observed that ‘Fuller was the first, really’). Fuller’s 1930s projects for the Dymaxion Bathroom, Dymaxion Car and Wichita House were featured in Archigram 3, 1963 (Project no. 100.3); Underwater Island featured in Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5); Dymaxion World featured in Archigram 7, 1966 (Project no. 100.7). Bucky Fuller structures also appeared in many of Archigram’s lecture slides and ephemera: e.g. 'Undersea Island' in Dennis Crompton’s ‘Structures’ and 'Note 1.1' in Warren Chalk’s ‘Letters Articles Drawings’. Fuller had a stronger following amongst British architects than in the USA, and was personally close to two key Archigram collaborators, Reyner Banham and Cedric Price, though not as close to the actual members of Archigram.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Ron Gauld
    Distributed Archigram 4, 1964 (Project no. 100.4), at the Architectural Association as a fifth-year student. Gauld was an architect in private practice in London, but is now running a bed-and-breakfast hotel in Barga, Tuscany.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Leopold Gersler
    His Ziggurat housing project in Israel featured in Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Martin Godfrey
    Contributor to Archigram 6, 1965 (Project no. 100.6) where his project Animal Planning was featured.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • A. Golding
    Student at the Yale Graduate School who graduated in 1966. His projects with Craig Hodgetts and Doug Michels featured in Archigram 7, 1966 (Project no. 100.7).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Graham Foundation
    Founded in 1956, the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts makes project-based grants to individuals and organizations and produces public programs to foster the development and exchange of diverse and challenging ideas about architecture and its role in the arts, culture, and society. The Foundation gave a grant in 1997 for Archigram's exhibition Archigram: Experimental Architecture 1961-1974 at the Thread Waxing Space in New York, 1998, and also in 2006 for Hadas Steiner's book Beyond Archigram: The Structure of Circulation.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Nicholas Grimshaw
    Internationally successful High-Tech architect. Studied at the Architectural Association, where he fell under the spell of Cedric Price and Gordon Pask, the cybernetics expert. Grimshaw’s final thesis project for a university in Covent Garden (1964-5) featured in Archigram 7, 1966 (Project no. 100.7), where he was also listed as a ‘newcomer’. He established Farrell/Grimshaw Partnership with Terry Farrell in 1965 and designed buildings like prefabricated plastic bathroom tower (1967; demolished) and Herman Miller Factory, Bath (1976). Grimshaw went on to form his own successful practice in 1980 whose designs include the Eden Centre in Cornwall. Grimshaw was elected the President of the Royal Academy of Arts in 2004.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • S. Groppo
    Student at the School of Architecture in Rome. Contributed to Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5) where his design with C. Antonioli, B. Berandi, M. Cocco, G. Di Salvo, C. Ettore, A. Sebasti, F. Tegolini, M. Tondi and G. Tornelli for the PRG centre in Rome was featured.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Anthony Gwilliam
    Architect, teacher, artist, filmmaker, theatre, web and digital designer, ecological designer committed to doing 'more with less'. Studied at Nottingham University, worked with Buckminster Fuller, taught at the AA, Sci-Arc (including on Sacred Geometry) and founded Maintainer, a company for the design and production of inflatable furniture, objects and buildings (featured in Ephemera). He also developed his own 'T-House', an environmentally lightweight Balinese building type for specially sensitive environments, and Bloo Lagoon sustainable tourist village. Contributor to Archigram 2, 1962 (Project no. 100.2) where his library project is also featured.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Andrew Hall
    Author of Frost, for which Warren Chalk designed the book jacket, 1966 (Project no. 89).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Patrick Hamilton
    Trained at the Architectural Association, graduating in 1964. He contributed to Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5) where his project for housing in the City of London was featured.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Richard Hamilton
    Immensely influential Pop Artist, whose 1956 painting/collage 'Just What is it That Makes Today's Homes So Different, So Appealing?' is often called the first piece of Pop Art. He was a member of the Independent Group who contributed to the famous This Is Tomorrow exhibition at the ICA (1956). He arranged the front and back covers of Living Arts magazine, 1963 (project no. 37).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • David Harrison
    His project with Simon Connolly, Mike Davies, Johnny Devas and Dave Martin for Flopout 3: 'Non-Pod' featured in Archigram 8, 1968 (Project no. 100.8).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Frank Brian Harvey
    Collaborated with Ron Herron on Ulster Museum Competition, 1964 (Project no. 66) and on the drawings for Walking City, 1964 (Project no. 64).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Haus Rucker-Co
    Laurids Ortner, Klaus Pinter and Gunthe (Zamp) Kelp co-founded the experimental architecture group Haus-Rucker-Co in Vienna in 1967, being joined by Manfred Ortner in 1971; the group survived until 1987. Their project, Balloon for Two, was featured in Archigram 8, 1968 (Project no. 100.8). The Ortners went on to found the architectural practice Ortner&Ortner; Kelp went on to teach architecture internationally; and Klaus Pinter’s art installations have been shown at MoMA, Pompidou Centre and many other international venues.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Christine Hawley
    Architect and teacher. Studied and taught at the Architectural Association, working for the Department of the Environment, RHWL, the De Soissons Partnership and YRM before setting up Cook and Hawley architects in 1975 with Peter Cook. She went on to become head of Architecture at East London University, and Professor and then Dean of the Bartlett School of Architecture, University College London. Project with Cook included the Trondheim Library, Berlin Housing and the Langen Glass Museum. In 1988 she set up Christine Hawley Architects.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Brian Haynes
    His Woman’s Mirror project was featured in Archigram 7, 1966 (Project no. 100.7).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Pat Haynes
    Made the ‘suit’ of the Suitaloon, 1966 (Project no. 96), as modelled by David Greene at Milan Triennale, 1967-8 (Project no. 107), and featured in Archigram 8, 1968 (Project no. 100.8).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Margaret Helfand
    (1947- 2007) American architect who studied at Berkeley and then the Architectural Association. She worked in the Archigram office on Bournemouth Steps, 1970 (Project no. 145). Subsequently she worked for Skidmore Owings Merrill (SOM) and in her own private practice. Helfand served as President of the New York Chapter of the American Institute of Architects, and was co-founder of the Center for Architecture in New York.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Andrew Herron
    Architect and elder son of Ron and Pat Herron. He worked on Suburban Sets, 1974, (Project no.189), along with Ron Herron, which featured in Archigram 9 ½, 1974 (Project no.100.95). He was the author of Subsets, and worked with his father in Herron Associates, along with his younger brother Simon, on projects including the Imagination Building in Store Street in London.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Simon Herron
    Architect and younger son of Ron and Pat Herron. He trained at Sheffield University and the Architectural Association, and worked with his father in Herron Associates, along with his older brother Andrew, on projects including the Imagination Building in Store Street in London. Simon Herron has been a prolific teacher – mostly in conjunction with his partner Susanne Isa – at the University of Westminster, Oxford Brookes University and, latterly, at the Bartlett School, UCL. He has also acted as an advisor on the Archigram Archival Project.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Craig Hodgetts
    Student at the Yale Graduate School who graduated in 1966. His projects with A. Golding and Doug Michels featured in Archigram 7, 1966 (Project no. 100.7).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Hans Hollein
    Highly influential and challenging Austrian architect, teacher, designer, exhibition designer and artist, and Pritzker Prize winner. Studied at Akademie der Bildenden Künste in Vienna, IIT in Chicago, and Berkeley, University of California. Early radical works included his Aircraft Carrier collage, his candle and jewellery stores in Vienna as well as exhibition designs like the Turks Before Vienna. Later, often more historically influenced and monumental projects include the Abteiburg Museum in Monchengladbach, the Museum of Modern Art in Frankfurt, the Haas House shopping centre in Vienna, the Vulcania Museum in the Auvergne, and his unrealised project for the Guggenheim in Salzburg, as well as many art projects and major exhibition designs. His project titled Architectural Form was featured in Archigram 4, 1964 (Project no. 100.04). He was also a contributor to Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.05) where his City Centre Study was featured.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Andrew Holmes
    Architect, artist and teacher. Holmes studied at the Architectural Association and began working for Piano & Rogers in the early-1970s on the Pompidou Centre. He was a collaborator on Calverton End Adventure Playground in Milton Keynes, 1972 (Project no. 165) and went on to found the elusive Casa Verde with David Greene (post-Archigram) and to teach alongside Greene at the Architectural Association, University of Westminster and Oxford Brookes University, where he is now Professor of Architecture. His photo-realistic crayon drawings (including Gas-Tank-City) and paintings have been widely exhibited.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Ian Horton
    Student at Regent Street Polytechnic, London (now University of Westminster), and the Architectural Association, graduating in 1963. He contributed to Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5) with Graham Anthony and Terry Stuart where their project for South Bank Linear City was featured in that issue.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Institute of Contemporary Arts (ICA)
    London-based cultural institution that acted as a confluence of cultural and intellectual ideas in the 1950s and 1960s, as well as hosting key Archigram events. The ICA is currently located on The Mall but was originally in Dover Street, Mayfair. Based on a pre-war idea by Peggy Guggenheim to set up a London equivalent to the Museum of Modern Art in New York, it was co-founded in 1947 by Roland Penrose, Herbert Read and others. During the 1950s it acted as a key forum for introducing American art to Britain, including the first British exhibition of Jasper Pollock’s drip paintings. The ICA and its circles attracted those with an interest in US culture generally, such as the Independent Group (whose members included Reyner Banham and John McHale, who subsequently emigrated to the USA to work with Buckminster Fuller). The ICA also ran an influential bookshop and, as such, was listed as distributor of Archigram 4, 1964 (Project no. 100.04). Its Dover Street premises acted as the venue for Archigram’s celebrated Living City exhibition, 1963 (Project no. 36), whereas its new location in The Mall hosted the ‘Cheer Up: It’s Archigram’ exhibition, 1972-73 (Project no. 161), as well as the Archigram 'Cheer Up 2', which was a two-day symposium on 14th-15th October 2006 to mark the start of the Archigram Archival Project. Peter Cook was the Director of the ICA between 1970-72.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Arata Isozaki
    Hugely influential, prolific and expressive Japanese architect. Worked for Kenzo Tange before founding his own firm in 1963. His project, Clusters in the Air, Tokyo (1963) featured in Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.05). Isozaki worked on Expo 70, Osaka, and his project Robots under the Kenzo Tange Roof Pavilion, Osaka, featured in Archigram 9, 1970 (Project no. 100.09). His hand-written essay, entitled ‘Imaginary Architecture, Ron Herron: The Magician of the Apparition’, is held within the Herron Archives.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Roger Jeffs
    Artist who worked on the Light/Sound Workshop at Hornsey College Art (Media Experiments 1-4, 1968, [Project no. 118]). Worked also on Airplane Panels for the Milan Triennale installation, 1967-8 (Project no. 107), featured in Archigram 8, 1968 (Project no. 100.8). His project on Informaison Multi-Channel Audio-Visual Environmental System, with John Bowstead, featured in Archigram 8.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • John Johansen
    Visionary American architect who revered Buckminster Fuller, and who married Walter Gropius’s daughter, Ati. He came to recognition for a series of ‘sprayed-on’ double-curved concrete houses in mid-1950s America, using a technique taken from swimming-pool construction. His designs, like Spray House Project no. 2 (1955), were lapped up eagerly by Mike Webb and other Archigram members. When Johansen visited London in the early-1960s, he met Archigram and they subsequently became close friends. Johansen remains an apostle of technological innovation as seen in later projects such as the Mummer’s Theatre in Oklahoma City (1966-70) and the Smith Elementary School in Columbus, Indiana (1969-70).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Philip Johnson
    Vastly influential American Modernist and later Post-Modernist architect and patron. He was one of those credited for introducing Modernist architecture to America through the 1932 MoMA exhibition 'The International Style: Modern Architecture (since 1922)'. Johnson was an early supporter of Mies van der Rohe, whose design for the Farnsworth House inspired Johnson's own Glass House in New Canaan, Connecticut; the latter was completed in 1949, before the Farnworth House itself. Johnson also worked on Mies' Seagram Tower in New York, Later, Johnson's AT&T building with John Burgee, also in New York, was perhaps the most controversial of all the Post-Modern buildings, flaunting its cheeky historicist Georgian pediment to the horror of modernists. His scheme for a Memorial to J. F. Kennedy was featured in Archigram 9, 1970 (Project no. 100.09).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Walter Jonas
    (1910-1979) Walter Jonas was a founding member of the Groupe International d’Architecture Prospective (GIAP) in 1965, with Yona Friedman, Paul Maymont, Georges Patrix, Michel Ragon, Ionel Schein et Nicolas Schöffer. His Intra Haus City project with Rudolph Kaltenstadler and F. Steinbruchel was featured in Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Fred Jones
    Worked on Royal Mint Square Housing, 1974 (Project no.180) with Warren Chalk, as featured in Archigram 9 ½, 1974 (Project no. 100.95).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Ronald Jones
    Trained at the Architectural Association, graduating in 1950, and later at the University of Pennsylvania, after which he lived and worked in the USA and London. He contributed to Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.05), where his Living Plan City, Superblock Model, London (1950) was featured.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Diana Jowsey
    Student of Peter Cook and Dennis Crompton at the Architectural Association. She worked in the Archigram office and collaborated on many projects including Batiment Public Monte Carlo, 1969-73 (Project no. 134); Regents Park Road, 1969 (Project no. 135); Bournemouth Steps, 1970 (Project no. 145); Paris Exhibition, 1970 (Project no. 148); New Summer Sporting: Monte Carlo Chameleon, 1971, (Project no.153); AA 125 exhibition, 1972 (Project no.158); Cranbourne Court, 1972 (Project no.162); Tuning London, 1972, (Project no. 164) with Ron Herron; Calverton End Adventure Playground in Milton Keynes, 1972, (Project no. 165) with Dennis Crompton and Ron Herron; Royal Mint Square Housing, 1974 (Project no.180). Jowsey was a contributor to Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5), Archigram 8, 1968 (Project no. 100.8), Archigram 9, 1970 (Project no. 100.09), and Archigram 9 ½, 1974 (Project no. 100.95).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Rudolph Kaltenstadler
    His Intra Haus City Project with Walter Jonas and F. Steinbruchel was featured in Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.05).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Per Kartvedt
    Norwegian architect and teacher. Worked with Dennis Crompton, Peter Cook, Ron Herron, Tony Dugdale and Cedric Price on Soria Moria, 1974 (Project No. 185).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Terry Kennedy
    Studied architecture at the University of Manchester with Dennis Crompton and Alan Waterhouse. Collaborator on the Lincoln Civic Centre Competition, 1961 (Project no. 29) with Warren Chalk, Dennis Crompton and Mike Webb.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Terry Kenney
    Distributed copies of Archigram 4, 1964 (Project no. 100.04) as a fourth-year student at the Manchester School of Architecture.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Paul Khera
    Graphic designer, artist, designer, photographer, filmmaker, and designer/developer of Spa Retreat Dharamsala. He collaborated with David Greene on 'Searching for the Perfect Location for an Architectural Suicide', 1994 (Project no. 204).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Fredric Kiesler
    (1890-1965) Seminal designer of the Endless House (1956-64), a dramatic proposal where the interior spaces are made from a single, twisting and wrapping surface. He was listed in ’People to look out for’ in Archigram 6, 1965 (Project 100.6).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Kiyonori Kikutake
    His project for Marine Civilisation, Marine City was featured in Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.05).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Kisho Noriaki Kurokawa
    Kisho Noriaki Kurokawa (1934-2007) was an highly influential Japanese architect and founding member of the Metabolist movement in 1960. Advocating an organic, changeable architecture which emphasised the idea of clip-on elements to change a structure, the Metabolist group's work culminated in 1970 with the Osaka World Expo. He co-ordinated Archigram's stand at the Osaka Expo, 1968 (Project no. 120) (credited as Noriaki Kurokawa). In 1962, Kurokawa founded Kisho Architects, with notable projects including Nakagin Capsule Tower (Ginza, Tokyo, 1970-1972), and Capsule Inn Osaka in 1977, thought of as the first pod hotel.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Peter Lacey
    Studied at the Architectural Association. Lacey's work formed part of a collage that featured in Archigram 7, 1966 (Project no. 100.7).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Gerald Laing
    His project with Terry Stewart titled Paris Biennale Environment – Expanding Structure (1963) was featured in Archigram 4, 1964 (Project no. 100.04).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Clive Latimer
    Leader of the Advanced Studies Group at Hornsey College of Art.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Stuart Lever
    Worked in the Archigram office on New Summer Sporting: Monte Carlo Chameleon, 1971 (Project no. 153).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • J.A. Lewis
    Worked with Archigram on the Margate Study, 1972-3 (Project no. 168) as a Marine Civil Engineer.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • David Lewis
    Contributor to Archigram 2, 1962 (Project no. 100.2), in which the scheme for House Built from Industrial Units in Huddersfield, co-designed with Peter Stead, was featured. As a close colleague of Stead’s, they went on jointly set up an urban design consultancy in Pittsburgh, USA, in the mid-1960s. Stead was Visiting Professor at Carnegie Mellon University, where Lewis had also been invited to set up an Urban Design postgraduate course. Lewis stayed on at Carnegie Mellon to become a distinguished professor/practitioner and, apparently contrary to his earlier work, an adherent of New Urbanism.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Roy Lichtenstein
    (1923-1997) Extremely famous and significant American Pop Artist. His trademark comic strip-type imagery was extensively adopted in Archigram 4, 1964 (Project no. 100.4).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Frank Linden
    Architect who went on to teach at the University of Greenwich and run a private practice. His design for Tower 3, Plug-In Entertainment Rooms, was featured in Archigram 4, 1964 (Project no. 100.4).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • London County Council (LCC)
    The LCC had a prestigious and influential public architecture department producing a stream of public buildings. Three members of Archigram worked there in the late-1950s and early-1960s: Ron Herron, Warren Chalk and Dennis Crompton. This included the early years of Archigram, and some of the LCC projects they worked on there are listed within the Archigram Archives. These schemes are: Prospect County College for Girls, Ron Herron, 1954-57 (Project no. 1); Shoreditch Secondary Modern School, Warren Chalk, 1956 (Project no. 2); Clapham County College for Girls, Warren Chalk, 1958 (Project no. 4); Hall of Residence, Northampton CAT, Ron Herron, 1958 (Project no. 5); 500-bed hotel project on the South Bank, Ron Herron,1958 (Project no. 6); TV centre and offices on the South Bank, Ron Herron et al, 1958 (Project no. 7); Chelsea College of Art, Warren Chalk, 1958 (Project no. 9); Woolwich Polytechnic College (now part of the University of Greenwich), Ron Herron, 1959 (Project no. 12). Other architects working at the LCC contributed to or collaborated on these particular projects and are therefore listed as contributing to ‘Archigram’ projects, including Peter Nicholl, Alan Forrest, Claus Seligman and John Attenborough. There is an advert for London County Council in Archigram 2, 1962 (Project no. 100.2), with a picture of Walworth School, designed by Jim Farthing. The LCC became the Greater London Council (GLC) in 1965 and was closed down in 1986 by the then Prime Minister, Margaret Thatcher.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Victor Lundy
    Architect and artist who was part of the Sarasota Arts Group in the 1960s. His projects include the Unitarian Churches in Westport and Hartford, Connecticut. His AEC Exhibition Structure was featured in Archigram 6, 1965 (Project no. 100.6).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Sutherland Lyall
    Architect, architectural critic, editor, author and writer, who wrote frequently about Archigram. Former editor of Building Design, and author of Remarkable Structures, Designing the New Landscape (with Geoffrey Jellicoe) and The Lady and the Unicorn. 



    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Mario Maestranz
    Distributed copies of Archigram 4, 1964 (Project no. 100.4) as a fourth-year student at the North London Polytechnic (now London Metropolitan University).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Jacques Malnati
    Studied architecture in Geneva. He contributed to Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5), in which his and Philippe Moreno's Quarter for 9,000 People was featured.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Wilfred Marden
    Contributor to Archigram 2, 1962 (Project no 100.2), with his and John Outram’s design for Westminster (1959).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • John Margolies
    American historian of the everyday who became especially close to Dennis Crompton after they met at an Aspen Design Conference organized by Reyner Banham in the late-1960s, which Archigram members attended. Margolies records the dying roadside ephemera of the USA, including gas stations, motels, hotels and cinema, seen as being killed off by the advent of the post-war Interstate highways. His passion chimed with Archigram’s love of the freedom of American highway culture, with its motion-based existence and seemingly unbounded edges.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Ken Martin
    Architect and teacher, Professor and former Head of Liverpool Polytechnic School of Architecture (now Liverpool John Moores University). As a recent graduate of Liverpool School of Architecture, he contributed to Archigram 2, 1962 (Project no. 100.2). Later he became the principal of Ken Martin Architects and fronted various television programmes during the 1980s on architectural subjects.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • John Martin
    Studied at the Architectural Association, London, with Digby Bridges and Harry Moon, graduating in 1962. Their Euroway project (1962), with Jim Farrow, was featured in Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Dave Martin
    His project with Simon Connolly, Mike Davies, Johnny Devas and David Harrison for Flopout 3: 'Non-Pod' featured in Archigram 8, 1968 (Project no. 100.8).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Paul Maymont
    A founding member of the Groupe International d’Architecture Prospective (GIAP) in 1965, with Yona Friedman, Walter Jonas, Georges Patrix, Michel Ragon, Ionel Schein et Nicolas Schöffer. His project for Paris featured in Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Marshall McLuhan
    (1911-1980) Hugely influential Canadian cultural theorist and writer known for his celebratory criticism of the role and influence of the mass media in society, especially in books like The Mechanical Bride (1951), Understanding Media (1964) and The Medium is the Massage: An Inventory of Effects (1967).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Archie McNab
    Worked on Northampton Civic Centre Competition,1973 (Project no. 174) with Ron Herron, as featured in Archigram 9 ½, 1974 (Project no. 100.95).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • James Meller
    Along with Ben Banham and Gus Coral, Meller made a model of Plug-In City from the cut-out components of Archigram 7, 1966 (Project no. 100.7). Initially featuring in an Archigram exhibition, the model was later burnt in the Art Net space, footage of which is held by Dennis Crompton within the Archigram Archives.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • William Menking (Bill)
    American architect, architectural historian, writer, critic, and curator of architecture/urbanism. He studied architecture at the University of California, Berkeley in the 1960s and architectural history in the early-1980s at the Bartlett, UCL. Menking is the founder and editor of The Architects’ Newspaper, as well as professor of architecture, urbanism and city planning at Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, New York. He has organised, curated and created catalogues for international exhibitions on, among others, Archigram and the Italian radical architects Superstudio. He was commissioner and curator of the US Pavilion at the 2008 Venice Biennale. His ‘Archigram Family Tree’, created for the Design Museum’s Archigram exhibition in 2004, was published in Yale Perspecta 37. Menking is editing a book on Mike Webb and has also acted as an advisor on the Archigram Archival Project.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Metabolist Group
    Revered group of Japanese architects formed in the 1950s and 1960s who explored ‘megastructures’: large-scale, flexible and expandable structural and technological approaches to urban planning and building design. The members included Kisho Kurokawa, Kiyonoru Kitutake, Fumihiko Maki and many others. Their plan for part of Tokyo was featured in Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5), and they were mentioned as 'People to look out for' in Archigram 6, 1965 (Project 100.6).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Doug Michels
    Studied at the Yale Graduate School, graduating in 1966. His projects with A. Golding and Craig Hodgetts featured in Archigram 7, 1966 (Project no. 100.7). Michels went on to co-found Ant Farm, the closest American parallel to Archigram, and probably best known today for their Cadillac Ranch installation, ‘America’s Stonehenge’, located outside Amarillo in Texas (1974). He died in a hiking accident in Australia in 2003.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Harry Moon
    Studied at the Architectural Association, London, with Digby Bridges and John Martin, graduating in 1962. Their Euroway project (1962), with Jim Farrow, was featured in Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Philippe Moreno
    Student of architecture in Geneva. He contributed to Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5), in which his and Jacques Malnati's Quarter for 9,000 People was featured.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Ingrid Morris
    Architect who worked on Royal Mint Square Housing, 1974 (Project no.180) with Warren Chalk, as featured in Archigram 9½, 1974 (Project no. 100.95).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Gail Murray
    Younger daughter of Warren Chalk. She has taught art, printing and pastels at Bromley College of Art for over a decade. She helped to cut out the 'pop-up' centre-spread of Archigram 4, 1964 (Project no. 100.4). Murray has also acted as an advisor on the Archigram Archival Project.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Peter Murray
    Architect and journalist who as a student was the co-publisher of Clip-Kit in 1966, a short-lived 'little' magazine also concerned with Buckminster Fuller, Archigram and related experimental architectural thinking. He was appointed as technical editor of Architectural Design, and subsequently became editor of Building Design, then RIBA Journal. Today he is chairman of Wordsearch consultancy as well as running the New London Architecture gallery and organises the London Architecture Biennale. His work appears in Archigram 6, 1965 (Project no. 100.6).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • George Nelson
    Famous American architect and interior designer whose Unit House for Homestyle Centre (1957) was published in Archigram 3, 1963 (Project no. 100.3).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Frank Newby
    (1926-2001) Hugely respected and influential engineer who worked with Archigram Architects on Batiment Public Monte Carlo, 1969-1973 (Project no.134). He was also a close friend and collaborator with Cedric Price, and as such worked on the Fun Palace and other projects. Newby’s many seminal projects include: Skylon Tower, Festival of Britain (1951); Aviary, London Zoo (1965) with Lord Snowdon and Cedric Price; University of Leicester Engineering Building with James Stirling and James Gowan (1963). Newby was awarded the Institute of Structural Engineers Gold Medal in 1985.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Peter Nicholl
    Worked at the LCC Architects Department and was principal architect of Prospect County College, 1954-57 (Project no. 1), where the job architect was Ron Herron.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Constant Nieuwenhuys
    (1920-2005) Known simply as ‘Constant’, he was an highly influential Dutch artist and an outspoken and controversial member of the Situationist International group. Constant is most famous for his seminal New Babylon project in which from the late-1950s he explored the city of the future in terms of evolution of post-revolutionary man into untrammelled ‘Homo Ludens’, or man-the-player. He contributed to Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5), where his New Babylon project was featured. Constant was also listed as one of the ‘People to look out for’ in Archigram 6, 1965 (Project 100.6).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Crispin Osborne
    Architect who trained at Regent Street Polytechnic (now University of Westminster), and then worked with Patrick Hodgkinson and Peter Moro in the 1960s. He also collaborated on the Lincoln Civic Centre Competition, 1961 (Project no. 28) with Peter Cook and David Greene. While still a student he distributed Archigram 4, 1964 (Project no. 100.4) at the Regent Street Polytechnic. During the 1970s, he worked at James Stirling’s and also taught with David Greene at the Architectural Association. His students there included John Pawson, with whom he formed the firm POSA - Pawson and Osborne, along with Claudio Silvestrin and John Andrews. Osborne became an associate at Munkenbeck & Marshall during 1980s, and his projects included the Yoji Yamamoto shop and a flat for Doris Saatchi. He died in 1998.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Steve Osgood
    Designer of Teignmouth Seaside Development (1960), which featured in Archigram 1, 1961 (Project no. 100.1).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Frei Otto
    Seminal German architect and structural engineer especially prolific in designing lightweight shells and tensile structures. He taught at Washington University in St Louis in the late-1950s alongside Buckminster Fuller and, in many ways, could be seen as a European version of the latter. Otto was responsible for many well-known designs of which the most publicised was probably the 1972 Olympic Games Arena in Munich. His scheme for a Small Concentrated Town was featured in Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5). Otto was also listed in ‘People to look out for’ in Archigram 6, 1965 (Project 100.6).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • John Outram
    Architect who was a contributor to Archigram 1, 1961 (Project no. 100.1), in which his Concert Hall at Westminster (1959) was featured with him listed as a recent graduate from the Architectural Association. He was a contributor to Archigram 2, 1962 (Project no 100.2), with his and Wilfred Marden’s Westminster Project (1959), and then Outram’s Project Motorway Community (1961) was featured in Archigram 6, 1965 (Project no. 100.6). He went on to form his own highly idiosyncratic office whose works include a celebrated project in the 1980s for a new Thames Water Pumping Station on the Isle of Dogs.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Claude Parent
    French experimental architect and theorist who collaborated with the philosopher Paul Virilio on the idea of 'fonction oblique', which stated that space should dominate surface and buildings should be created from continuous lines. Major projects include Villa Drusch, Église Sainte-Bernadette du Banlay, Nevers (1963-1966) and Pavillon Français (1970) for the Venice Biennale. Parent was listed in ‘People to look out for’ in Archigram 6, 1965 (Project no. 100.6) and attended the IDEA Folkestone Exhibition and Conference, 1966 (Project no. 87).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • M. Parlato
    Student at the School of Architecture in Rome. Contributed to Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5) where his design with G. Bertolini, L. Ceci, P. Cidonio, A. Rosti and H. Vezzali for the PRG centre in Rome was featured.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Gordon Pask
    (1928-1996) Hugely influential cybernetician and systems theorist; arguably Britain’s only major pioneer of cybernetic theory. His research company, System Research Ltd, was commissioned by the US Air Force and other bodies. He collaborated with Cedric Price on the Fun Palace and Generator projects, and in turn Price brought in Pask as a visiting lecturer at the Architectural Association, where he influenced many important future architects such as Nicholas Grimshaw. Pask contributed A Plan for An Aesthetically Potent Social Environment to Archigram 8, 1968 (Project no. 100.8).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Martin Pawley
    (1938-2008) Architect, editor, journalist, critic and teacher who studied at Oxford Polytechnic (now Oxford Brookes University), the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris, and finally the Architectural Association, where he set up the Ghost Dance Times paper. He contributed to Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5), in which his Living/Working Enclosure (1962) was featured, and he featured in Archigram 9, 1970 (Project no. 100.9) writing under the pseudonym Rupert Spade. Other projects by Pawley in the 1960s included Garbage Housing, based on the generation of building components out of consumer waste. Famously acerbic and amusing, Pawley went on to edit Building Design and World Architecture, and became the architectural correspondent for The Guardian. His many books, in which he called for radical new architecture based on the latest mass technologies, include Theory and Design in the Second Machine Age (1990), Terminal Architecture (1998) and The Strange Death of Architectural Criticism (2007).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Cesare Pea
    Milanese architect who designed the Centre of Information and Documentation in Torviscosa. His project for Expanding House was featured in Archigram 3, 1963 (Project no. 100.3).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Renzo Piano
    As a recent student of Milan Polytechnic School of Architecture, Piano and three of his colleagues (Foni, Huet and Ruggeri) were featured for their project, Reinforced Polyester House, in Archigram 3, 1963 (Project no. 100.3). Piano worked with Richard Rogers in the late-1960s, famously co-designing the winning entry for the Pompidou Centre competition. After his practice with Rogers split up in the mid-1970s, Piano established his own internationally famous High-Tech practice in Genoa including such lauded projects as the Bari Football Stadium, De Menil Gallery in Houston, and the ‘Shard’ tower in London.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Walter Pichler
    Austrian sculptor and architect who studied at the Academy for Applied Art in Vienna. He contributed to Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5), and his City Study (1962) was also featured in the same issue. His project Audio-Visual Helmet (TV Helmet; portable living room) then featured in Archigram 8, 1968 (Project no. 100.8).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Denis Postle
    Made and produced films for 30 years. He now works as a psychotherapist, counsellor, coach, supervisor, graphic designer and author with several websites. His film Beaubourg: Four Films by Denis Postle, Tattooist International, 1980 shows members of Archigram visiting the Pompidou Centre in Paris, and can be viewed through shared academic agreement on the Arts on Film Archive, created by the University of Westminster.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Shelley Power
    Paris-based literary agent. As well as being a long-standing friend of Archigram, she handles all legal issues and image permissions for the group.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Cedric Price
    (1934-2003) Hugely influential architect who deliberately pursued 'doubt, delight and change' in projects pursuing indeterminacy and seeking to avoid architecture's tendency to ossify or institutionalise activities and organisations. His most famous projects are: Fun Palace (1960-61), designed for Joan Littlewood; Potteries Thinkbelt (1965); and the Aviary at London Zoo (1965), with Frank Newby and Lord Snowdon, and he worked with Buckminster Fuller and Gordon Pask. Price contributed many things to Archigram’s magazines, beginning with the piece on ‘Activity and Change’ in Archigram 2, 1962 (Project no. 100.2), in which his Change and Movement projects (1958-60) were also featured. Fun Palace, London Zoo Aviary and the Hydraulic Dome at American Museum in Bath were all featured in Archigram 4, 1964 (Project no. 100.4). He contributed ‘Ced’s Bit’ to Archigram 6, 1965 (Project no. 100.6) and in the same issue, his Air Structure Project, Fun Palace (1964), Circlorama in Piccadilly Circus (1965) and Cidair Airhouse, were featured. The feature on ‘Ced’s Shed’ subsequently featured on the famous cut-out page of Archigram 7, 1966 (Project no. 100.7). Two more developed versions of Price’s Fun Palace feature in Archigram 8, 1968 (Project no. 100.8), and that issue also contained his item on Housing Research. He then contributed The Cedric Price Column to Archigram 9, 1970 (Project no. 100.9). Meanwhile, he had unsurprisingly been listed in ‘People to look out for’ in Archigram 6, 1965 (Project no. 100.6). Later on, Price collaborated with Archigram on Soria Moria, 1974 (Project no. 185).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Arthur Quarmby
    Iconoclastic British architect and designer who created projects such as a capsule bathroom for an exhibition in the mid-1960s out of two curved Perspex sheets. He was featured in the 'People to look out for' in Archigram 6, 1965 (Project no. 100.6). Author of The Plastics Architect (1974), he also invented inflatable bubble structures and a glass-reinforced-plastic panel system for railway switchgear enclosures. Archigram made a special trip to visit him in his Yorkshire workshop/studio. By the late-1960s, however, Quarmby had become the British pioneer of underground dwellings, following on from environmentalist experiments in the USA. He still lives in his own sunken creation outside Huddersfield, built in 1975.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Andrew Radwan
    He was a registered architect with whom Warren Chalk and Ron Herron worked on the BEA offices, 1959-1961 (Project nos. 13, 18, 20 and 26); Highfields Housing Competition, Halesowen, Birmingham, 1960 (Project no. 19); and Liverpool University Halls of Residence Competition, 1962 (Project no. 35).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Geoff Reeve
    Designed the front and back covers for Archigram 6, 1965 (Project no. 100.06).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Edward Reynolds
    His student project at the Architectural Association, titled Design for Concert Hall, Trafalgar Square (1957) was featured in Archigram 1, 1961 (Project no. 100.1).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Brian Richards
    Worked with Archigram on Margate Study, 1972-3 (Project no. 168) as Transportation and Movement consultant.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Tony Rickaby
    Artist who worked on the Light/Sound Workshop at Hornsey College of Art (Media Experiments 1-4, 1968, [Project no. 118]). He also worked on Airplane Panels for the Milan Triennale installation, 1967-8 (Project no. 107), as featured in Archigram 8, 1968 (Project no. 100.8) He contributed to Archigram 8, and later worked on the presentation drawings for the Monte Carlo competition, 1969-1973 (Project no. 134). Rickaby then designed the cover for Archigram 9, 1970 (Project no. 100.9). Subsequently, he exhibited his work at Adhocs Gallery, 1972 (Project no. 164), the Milan Triennale in 1972 and at ArtNet in 1974 and 1978.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Paul Ritter
    Architect and planner. Born in Prague, Ritter was educated in Britain and trained as an architect at Liverpool University. He became an enthusiast for Radburn-style planning where cars and pedestrians were kept separate, writing a famous book on the subject titled Planning for Man and Motor (1964). The scheme by Peter Cook and David Greene for Shopping District, Nottingham, 1962, (Project no. 34) which formed part of Ritter’s associated ‘Man and Motor’ exhibition, was featured in Archigram 3, 1963 (Project no. 100.3). Ritter moved to Australia in 1965 to become Perth’s first city planner/architect/planning, and subsequently designed several Radburn-style suburbs in his adoptive country.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • John Roberts
    Collaborator on the Lincoln Civic Centre Competition, 1961 (Project no. 29), with Warren Chalk, Dennis Crompton, Mike Webb. He was also a contributor to Archigram 2, 1962 (Project no. 100.2), in which his scheme for Lillington Street Housing, Westminster, 1961 (Project no. 22) with John Attenborough, Ron Herron, Warren Chalk and Dennis Crompton was featured.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Jack Robinson
    A model of his scheme for an Exhibition Project for Environment Depicting Life in the Year 2000 was featured in Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • David Rock
    Architect who ran the London office of Building Design Partnership, one of the largest multidisciplinary practices in post-war Britain. Through his efforts he arranged for BDP to provide sponsorship for Archigram’s magazines by taking out advertisements placed in Archigram 2, 1962 (Project no. 100.2); Archigram 3, 1963 (Project no. 100.3); Archigram 4, 1964 (Project no. 100.4); and Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5). He went on to found Rock Townsend with John Townsend and to become RIBA President. A lifelong supporter of the group, Rock was instrumental in the award of the RIBA’s most prestigious award, the Royal Gold Medal, to Archigram in 2002.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • A. Rosti
    Studied at the School of Architecture in Rome. Contributed to Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5) where his design with G. Bertolini, L. Ceci, P. Cidonio, M. Parlato and H. Vezzali for the PRG centre in Rome was featured.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Paul Rudolph
    (1918-1997) Highly eminent American Modernist and Brutalist architect. Rudolph came to note for a series of innovative steel-and-glass houses in Florida, resulting in his invitation to become Head of the Yale School of Architecture in the late-1950s. During his tenure there, Norman Foster and Richard Rogers were visiting Masters students; both still cite Rudolph as a major architectural influence. Rudolph became best known for heavyweight concrete structures such as the Yale Art and Architecture Building in the mid-1960s, recently restored. With the advent of Post-Modernism, his work went out of style in the USA and many of his later projects were in the Far East and elsewhere. Rudolph’s Project for a Trailer Tower was featured in Archigram 9, 1970 (Project no. 100.9).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Gordon Sainsbury
    Architect who studied at Bournemouth College of Art with Peter Cook then (slightly after Cook), at the Architectural Association. Together, Cook and Sainsbury co-designed the Piccadilly Circus Competition, 1961 (Project no. 24). Sainsbury instigated the advert by Scott Brownrigg Turner in Archigram 4, 1964 (Project no. 100.4), which was then overprinted before publication. He later moved to the USA and became Executive Director of the Design Selection Board of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, as well as a member of the American Institute of Architects.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Adrian Sansom
    Contributor to Archigram 2, 1962 (Project no. 100.2), in which his East End Housing (1961) was featured. Trained at the Architectural Association, he was associated with the ‘Grunt Group’ -- Chris Cross, Jeremy Dixon, Mike Gold and Ed Jones –- apparently so named by Peter Cook for their distaste for architectural theory or rhetoric, preferring dry austere Modernist forms instead. Working briefly together in practice, they designed housing schemes in Milton Keynes and elsewhere, before heading in separate directions. He taught at Canterbury School of Architecture and died in 1991.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Ionel Schein
    (1927-2004) French experimental architect who co-designed an all-plastic house as early as 1956. The Bathroom Component of this project was published in Archigram 3, 1963 (Project no. 100.3). Schein was also listed in ‘People to look out for’ in Archigram 6, 1965 (Project 100.6). His first name is sometimes incorrectly spelt as Lionel.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Eckhard Schulze-Fielitz
    German experimental architect who explored flexible spatial and megastructural systems, notably through schemes like Raumstruktur, Raumstadt. He also collaborated at times with Yona Friedman. Schulze-Fielitz’s project for a bridge, along with part of an experimental structure for a spatial city, were featured in Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5). He was listed in ‘People to look out for’ in Archigram 6, 1965 (Project 100.6).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Fred Scott
    Architect, interior designer, furniture designer, author and teacher. He worked with Archigram on design projects and appeared in some of their short films. Later, he taught at the Architectural Association, Rhode Island School of Design, Kingston Polytechnic, University of Westminster and elsewhere. He is the author of On Altering Architecture (2007).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • A. Sebasti
    Studied at the School of Architecture in Rome. Contributed to Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5) where his design with C. Antonioli, B. Berandi, M. Cocco, G. Di Salvo, C. Ettore, S. Groppo, F. Tegolini, M. Tondi and G. Tornelli for the PRG centre in Rome was featured.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Susan Segal
    Sociologist who worked with Archigram on Margate Study, 1972-3 (Project no. 168).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Claus Seligmann
    Studied at the Regent Street Polytechnic (now University of Westminster) and taught at the Architectural Association. He worked on the Enfield Civic Centre Competition, 1958 (Project no. 8) with Ron Herron and Warren Chalk. In 1964, Seligmann joined the University of Washington at Seattle, later becoming a professor there.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • William Siddons
    His project for Weekend Houses in Lovisa, Finland, was featured in Archigram 3, 1963 (Project no. 100.3).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Barry Snowden
    Designer and Fellow of the Chartered Society of Designers. He worked on several projects with Ron Herron: Leisure Study: Land/Sea/Air for IDEA, 1966 (Project no. 84); Free Time Node, 1966 (Project no. 85); Free-time Inflatable Dwelling, 1966, (Project no. 98); Air-Hab, 1967 (Project no. 99) which was then incorporated into the group’s Control & Choice Dwelling, 1967 (Project no.104); Promotional Event Kit, 1970 (Project no. 150) for John Players, Nottingham. Free Time Node featured on the cut-out sheet of Archigram 7, 1966 (Project no. 100.7). Snowden contributed to Archigram 8, 1968 (Project no. 100.8), in which his project 'Delftagram' (Lecture Project 1), 1967 (Project no. 106), with Ron Herron and Peter Cook, was featured as well as his Mass Tuition (Lecture Project 2). Mobile Action Terminal Extension (MATE) (1969) appears in Archigram 9, 1970 (Project no.100.9). He collaborated with Ron Herron on other projects, including an Architects Offices for Halperns, 1965, and Amsterdam City Hall competition, 1967.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Paolo Soleri
    Architect, potter, bellmaker and charismatic guru-like founder of the Arcosanti ‘arcology’ community in Arizona, a self-built, utopian settlement in the desert not far from Phoenix. Soleri contributed to Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5), in which his ‘Mesa City’ plan was featured. He was listed in ‘People to look out for’ in Archigram 6, 1965 (Project 100.6).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Jerzy Soltan
    (1913-2005) Born in Latvia, he lived in Poland and worked briefly for Le Corbusier after the war. With the advent of the Cold War, he emigrated to the USA. Soltan was listed in ‘People to look out for’ in Archigram 6, 1965 (Project 100.6). He went on to become Professor of Architecture and Urban Design at the Graduate School of Design at Harvard University and helped to convince Le Corbusier to take on the Carpenter Center project at Harvard. Listed under 'people to look out for', in Archigram 6, 1965 (Project 100.6).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Alan Stanton
    Studied at the Architectural Association and then formed Envirolab in 1968 with Denny Lord and Chris Dawson when at the Department of Urban Design, UCLA on a postgraduate course. They went on to become Chrysalis in 1969, along with Mike Davies. Stanton's Self-Structuring System featured in Archigram 8, 1968 (Project no. 100.8).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Peter Stead
    (1922-2000) Yorkshire-based architect, urban designer and art curator/gallery owner. He was invited to become Visiting Professor at Carnegie Mellon University from 1963-65, and while in Pittsburgh he co-founded an urban design consultancy with a British colleague, David Lewis, who was over setting up an Urban Design postgraduate course there. Returning to Britain in the late-1960s, Stead collaborated with Yona Friedman on a visionary project for a steel-and-glass town in Yorkshire, as well as working more prosaically with Victor Passmore on Peterlee. Stead was a contributor to Archigram 2, 1962 (Project no. 100.2), and his early project, co-designed with David Lewis and titled the House Built from Industrial Units, Huddersfield, was featured in that issue.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • F. Steinbruchel
    His Intra Haus City Project with Walter Jonas and Rudolph Kaltenstadler was featured in Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Terry Stewart
    His project with Gerald Laing titled Paris Biennale Environment – Expanding Structure (1963) was featured in Archigram 4, 1964 (Project no. 100.4).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Antoine Stinco
    French architect whose projects include the Modern Art Centre in Toulouse and the restoration of the Jeu de Paume Galleries in Paris. His earlier project for a Mobile Exhibition Hall was featured in Archigram 8, 1968 (Project no. 100.8).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Terry Stuart
    Student at Regent Street Polytechnic, London (now University of Westminster), and the Architectural Association, graduating in 1963. He contributed to Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5) with Graham Anthony and Ian Horton where their project for South Bank Linear City was featured in that issue. Stuart’s scheme for Transport Node was then featured in Archigram 6, 1965 (Project no. 100.6).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Superstudio
    Italian experimental architecture group that shared certain affinities with Archigram such as an interest in Pop Art, consumer culture and modern urban transformations; indeed, like Archizoom, can arguably be seen as consciously emulating the work of Archigram. Superstudio was founded in 1966 in Florence by Adolfo Natalini and Cristiano Toraldo di Francia, who had recently studied architecture at the University of Florence alongside Andrea Branzi of Archizoom. At times, Superstudio collaborated with their fellow Florentine group, Archizoom, such as on the Superarchitecture project (1966); other projects, such as the famous Continuous Monument (1969), were entirely their own. Their radical ideas and projects were widely published, especially in Casabella.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Ron Sutherland
    Worked on Airplane Panels for the Milan Triennale installation, 1967-8 (Project no. 107), as featured in Archigram 8, 1968 (Project no. 100.8). He was also listed as a contributor to Archigram 8.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Kenzo Tange
    (1913-2005) Probably the best-known and most respected of all architects in post-war Japan, whose prolific work ranges from the masterplan to rebuild Hiroshima (1946) to the National Gymnasium for the Tokyo Olympic Games (1964), from the masterplan for the 1970 Osaka Expo through to the Tokyo Dome Hotel (2000). Tange’s ambitious and highly influential Plan for Tokyo was featured in Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Geoff Taunton
    Architect who studied under Peter Cook at the Architectural Association. Editorial Assistant for Archigram 8, 1968 (Project no. 100.8) and Archigram 9, 1970 (Project no. 100.9). He appears to have gone on to specialise as a conservation architect, working for instance in the 1980s on the refurbishment of E.M. Barry’s galleries in the National Gallery in London.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Peter Taylor
    Graphic designer who produced the cover designs for Archigram 2, 1962 (Project no. 100.2) and Archigram 3, 1963 (Project no. 100.3). He also designed the poster for the Living City Exhibition, 1963 (Project no. 36).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Evelyn Taylor
    Did the text layout on Archigram 2, 1962 (Project no. 100.2).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Taylor Woodrow
    International construction firm that started out with Frank Taylor building two houses in Blackpool in 1921, and grew steadily into a major corporate entity. All the members of Archigram worked for Taylor Woodrow on various projects during the 1960s, which are therefore listed in the Archigram Archives as ‘Archigram’ projects. The most important of these was the Euston Station redevelopment, 1962-65 (Project no. 33), in a group led by Theo Crosby. They also worked together for Taylor Woodrow on the Fulham Study, 1963 (Project no. 42). Warren Chalk worked on the Liverpool Comprehensive Area Redevelopment, 1963 (Project no. 43) and the Entertainments Tower Project, 1963 (Project no. 50). Peter Cook worked on the Shopping Centre Project, Oxford Street, London, 1963 (Project no. 48) and the Entertainments Tower Project, 1963 (Project no. 51). Ron Herron worked on a separate Entertainments Tower Project, 1963 (Project no. 52). Warren Chalk, Dennis Crompton and Ron Herron then worked on Industrialised Housing for Southall, 1965 (Project no 73). This work provided day-jobs for Archigram members over a number of years, and many other projects might be said to ‘come’ out of the Taylor Woodrow office environment. For instance, the pop-up pages of Archigram 4, 1964 (Project no. 100.4), were cut out by hand by Archigram members while in the office.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • A. Teague
    Worked with Warren Chalk, Ron Herron and Dennis Crompton on their Lincoln Civic Centre Competition, 1961 (project no. 29).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • F. Tegolini
    Student at the School of Architecture in Rome. Contributed to Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5) where his design with C. Antonioli, B. Berandi, M. Cocco, G. Di Salvo, C. Ettore, S. Groppo, A. Sebasti, M. Tondi and G. Tornelli for the PRG centre in Rome was featured.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Timothy Tinker
    His design for a cinema in Westminster (1958) featured in Archigram 1, 1961 (Project no. 100.1). He was also a contributor to Archigram 2, 1962 (Project no. 100.2), in which his Moldgreen Housing (1960) was featured.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Tiranti’s Art Bookshop
    No longer extant, but once a celebrated stockist of art and architecture books in Charlotte Street in central London. As such, it acted as a distributor of Archigram magazines. The shop took out adverts in Archigram 4, 1964 (Project no. 100.4) and Archigram 9, 1970 (Project no. 100.9).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • M. Tondi
    Studied at the School of Architecture in Rome. Contributed to Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5) where his design with C. Antonioli, B. Berandi, M. Cocco, G. Di Salvo, C. Ettore, S. Groppo, A. Sebasti, F. Tegolini and G. Tornelli for the PRG centre in Rome was featured.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • G. Tornelli
    Studied at the School of Architecture in Rome. Contributed to Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5) where his design with C. Antonioli, B. Berandi, M. Cocco, G. Di Salvo, C. Ettore, S. Groppo, A. Sebasti, F. Tegolini and M. Tondi for the PRG centre in Rome was featured.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Bernard Trey
    His project 'A Habitat Built in Rock for a Community of Scientists in China' was featured in Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Bernard Tschumi
    Hugely influential Swiss-French architect, event artist, writer and teacher, a major figure in Deconstructivist and 'event' architecture. He worked in the Archigram office on several projects: Batiment Public Monte Carlo, 1969-1973 (Project no. 134); New Summer Sporting: Monte Carlo Chameleon, 1971 (Project no. 153); contributor, Archigram Opera, 1974 (Project no. 175). At the same time, he was a tutor at the Architectural Association. Later seminal projects by Tschumi included Advertisements for Architecture (art exhibition), Event Cities (book), the Parc de la Villette in Paris, won in competition in the 1980s, and most recently the New Acropolis Museum in Athens. For many years he was Head of the Columbia School of Architecture in New York, where he still runs his main practice office.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • David Usborne
    Listed as the ‘Editor’ of Archigram 1, 1961 (Project no 100.1).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Dalibor Vesely
    Celebrated professor of architecture, specialising in hermeneutics and phenomenology. Born in Prague, he studied in Prague and Munich, and then came to work in Britain. He was listed in ‘People to look out for’ in Archigram 6, 1965 (Project no. 100.6). Vesely went on to teach at the University of Essex, Architectural Association and University of Cambridge. His major tome, Architecture in the Age of Divided Representation (2004), now seems antithetical to Archigram’s work.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • H. Vezzali
    Studied at the School of Architecture in Rome. Contributed to Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5) where his design with G. Bertolini, L. Ceci, P. Cidonio, M. Parlato and A. Rosti for the PRG centre in Rome was featured.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Alan Waterhouse
    Architect who studied at University of Manchester with Dennis Crompton and Terry Kennedy. Waterhouse worked for the London County Council on the Hayward Gallery prior to Crompton’s involvement, and then also with Crompton on the Liverpool Roman Catholic Cathedral competition, 1959 (Project no.16) and the Lincoln Civic Centre Competition, 1961 (Project no. 29). He corresponded with Reyner Banham on architectural matters.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Josef Weber
    A ‘Newcomer’ mentioned in Archigram 6, 1965 (Project. No. 100.6), and also listed in that issue under ‘People to look out for’.


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • Bobby Wilson
    Architect who worked in the Archigram office on the scheme for Bournemouth Steps, 1970 (Project no. 145).


    Back to compact view Back to top
  • T.C. Zenatos
    His work was featured in Archigram 5, 1964 (Project no. 100.5).


    Back to compact view Back to top